>Rose Veal with Apples and Mustard Mash

>
Man, I love this time of year. This week Yorkshire seems to have been transformed into Antarctica, and that just gives me another reason to eat massively calorific food, stop going to the gym and drink loads of beer. I’m storing fat, you see. And this is fun.
Anyway, after looking to my German cookbooks for inspiration, this is what we came up with – easy, and tastes good. But it’s not kind on the waistline – be warned.

Rose Veal with Apples and Mustard Mash (Serves two)

You will need:

2 Rose Veal escalopes
2 English Apples – sliced and cored (any kind will do, really)
1 Large onion – sliced (Or 4 smaller ones)
20g Smoked Cheese
1tsp of wholegrain mustard
2 large potatoes, mashed
lots of butter
salt, pepper ( I actually used some smoked salt, if you have it)

1. First, get your potatoes on to boil in preparation for the mashing. In the meantime, melt a knob of butter in a heavy pan and once sizzling, add your onions and apples. Leave for a couple of minutes for the apples to caramelize on one side, then toss to ensure the other side gets done. you can then turn the heat down a little and leave the apples and onions to caramelise whilst you..
2. …Mash your potatoes in the usual way – with a little milk and butter. Add your smoked cheese, chopped, and the mustard. Stir and cover – the cheese needs to melt.
3. Finally, in another hot pan, sear you veal but take care not to overdo it – it can dry out easily.

All you have to do now is serve and enjoy. If the apples and onions get dry, you simply need to keep adding butter to ensure a gooey, even caramelization.

To drink with a meal of this kind, I wanted something light but sweet – so I opted for the Tongerlo 6 Dubbel Bruin. Very much a typical Dubbel, it has a slight carbonation that strips a little of the sweetness of the apples away, but its own nutmeggy caramel touches compliment the smoky, rich flavours of the food nicely. If you wanted to deglaze the pans and make a little sauce, I would imagine this would do the job very well.

I’m not going to reply to any comments regarding the use of veal in this dish. This is a food and beer blog, not a political one – there are plenty of those around if you want to air your views. Unfortunately there are many things wrong with food culture these days, and you can simply make a choice not to eat something if you don’t agree with it. I used Rose Veal, which is farmed according to RSPCA standards, and I bought it from a Farm Shop in Weeton, Otley – therefore I am happy that I have made the correct choice in terms of provenance. If you make this dish, please try and make the same choices.

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About leighgoodstuff

Blog: https://goodfoodgoodbeer.wordpress.com/ I'm Leigh Linley; born and bred in Leeds, and writing about it since 2005. TGS exists solely to highlight the great beers that are out there; brewed with passion by Craft Brewers around the World. I also edit the 'Tavern Tales' section of Culture Vulture, which looks at Pubs and Pub Life rather than the beer in the glass. If you'd like to submit a piece for Tavern Tales, or contact me about any Freelance writing you think I would be suited to, then don't hesitate to contact me via email here.

Posted on 07/12/2008, in Apples, Belgian Beer, German food, Onions, Rose Veal, winter recipes. Bookmark the permalink. 11 Comments.

  1. >That looks delicious, and in fact similar to a recipe I made using pork loin. Goes great with the apples of course, but i also add a touch of brandy, wholegrain mustard, and cream (after the apples have been done and removed). I love adding a bit of cheese to mash, but never thought of smoked cheese. Brilliant!On a completely unrelated note, A colleague (who is a forester, and in Germany is hence a hunter) gave me a leg of a wild boar (well he sold it to me). Any suggestions for how to treat this? I love boar but have never cooked it myself before.

  2. >I’ve come back from Germany craving lentils and green veg, but I’m sure I’ll return to this (or a variant on it) once I’m over that…

  3. >Looks superb and appreciate your comments on ethical sourcing of rose veal which is slowly making a well deserved come back.

  4. >Adeptus – absolutely – pork loin would be a great substitute. and yeah – smoked cheese adds a real depth and goes so well again with the beer. As for Boar – Boar casserole/stews/carbonades usually end up good – why not try a stew with a decent beer…i’m thinking maybe a porter or dark mild – and then stuff that in a pie! It’s pretty robust stuff. Boak – oh yeah, once you’ve got those lentils out of your sysem! FF – thanks!

  5. >Those potatoes sound divine. We can see them disappearing in seconds.

  6. >Ya know, I was asking the hunter if I could use boar in a sauerbraten (this was before I knew I was only getting a leg, and I thinkI had a board based one before that was delicious) and he said he wouldn’t give me any if I’d do that to it :DHe reckoned a simple roast would let the meat speak for itself. He’s probably right, but I can’t help wanting some sort of embelleshment though! :)Apparently he bagged a 95 kilo boar last weekend! He had to call for help to get it home.

  7. >I’m going to try this recipe this next weekend, but with a glass of my IBIPA ale.

  8. >I’ve just finished a plate full of pork and veg with cheese and wholegrain mustard mash – it was superb and inspired by this post! At a time of year when I can’t seem to motivate myself to do anything that’s a bigger thing that it seems.Oh and nice comments about the veal, it was right on the money and it doesn’t come across to “preachy”.

  9. >adeptus – it’d be cool and you know it. Much like with beer – as long as the ingredients are a fresh and good as posible – which i think youve got no worries there(!) thne that boar should really sing. John – thanks mate, appreciated. Glad you enjoyed the food. Badben -from the yeast in the IBIPA on your blog I think you’d be on thr right trail there…

  10. >This sounds like a lovely ingredient combination. I’m not much of a beer drinker, but love to use it in cooking. I can picture this same dish simmered with mustard and beer to create a bit of a sauce to go over everything…. Mmmmmm!

  11. >I’ll give this a try… hubby would love it… thanks for sharing 🙂

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